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TSF provides satellite connectivity to the coordination center in Les Cayes – Haiti

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TSF installed high-speed satellite connectivity in the first humanitarian coordination center installed in Les Cayes, the main city in one of the areas most affected by the powerful earthquake that hit southwestern Haiti on August 14.

Access to areas near the epicenter has been particularly difficult for humanitarian organizations due to poor security and heavy rains caused by Tropical Storm Grace. This huge depression hit the same region two days after the earthquake and significantly damaged transport infrastructure.

“We joined the first convoys heading to the south-west of the country and provided satellite connectivity to the operations coordination center which was set up here in Les Cayes. This connection enables reliable information sharing between the local team of the National Directorate of Civil Protection (DGPC) and the national level in Port-au-Prince. It is also speeding up the establishment of the coordination center with the United Nations team for disaster assessment and coordination (UNDAC), ”commented Florent Bervas, TSF head of mission in Haiti.

The Les Cayes coordination center is set to become the main coordination center for the humanitarian response in the affected areas and will serve all relief organizations arriving on the ground.

At the same time, members of the TSF team also provide telecom support to UNDAC assessment operations carried out in the vicinity of Jérémie and Les Cayes, for example in the disaster areas of Aquin and Caveau Jean-Baptiste. These assessments made it possible to provide precise information on the damage and the needs of the populations to Haitian government agencies and organizations involved in the disaster response.

Over 2,200 victims have been confirmed, over 300 are still missing and over 12,000 injured. TSF works closely with the United Nations, Civil Protection, the National Emergency Operations Center (COUN), Help.ngo and all other organizations present in the field to ensure reliable telecom connectivity is available in the most critical areas. highest priority assigned. by the earthquake.


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OneWeb launches new device for terrestrial broadband service

The startup plans to integrate the flat-screen antenna with a OneWeb satellite modem into a sealed outdoor unit for distribution later this year.

OneWeb has launched a new user terminal designed to provide high-speed Internet connectivity to businesses, governments and remote communities.

OW1 was developed in partnership with South Korean antenna manufacturer Intellian Technologies and Collins Aerospace, a subsidiary of Raytheon Technologies.

The new terminal, OW1, is a low power, compact and electronically controlled antenna designed to receive OneWeb high speed internet connectivity for remote locations. The physical dimensions of the OW1 are 50cm by 43cm and 10cm high, “about the size of a briefcase,” OneWeb described in its ad.

The flat panel antenna integrates the OneWeb satellite modem into an environmentally sealed outdoor unit. The unit can be installed using an optional stabilized J-bracket and can connect to its indoor component via a single combined power and data cable.

Commenting on the new launch, Michele Franci, Head of Delivery at OneWeb, said, “We are delighted to bring this user terminal to market, and thank Intellian and Collins for their valuable partnership in making it a reality. OneWeb’s vision of connecting the world requires the hardware to do it, and we’re happy to be able to offer an affordable, compact, and easy-to-install user terminal. It will connect and empower communities and small and medium businesses, opening applications for a wide variety of purposes, including community Wi-Fi in remote areas; rural retail outlet systems; agricultural functions of the Internet of Things; and internet service at hotels, health clinics, research stations and more, located in places the status quo has left offline.

Eric Sung, President and CEO, Intellian Technologies Inc., added, “This agreement marks an exciting new step in our partnership with OneWeb, providing another unique Intellian user terminal to meet new markets and demands with a band high bandwidth and low latency user experience. The OW1 is our first flat panel antenna, after years of R&D investment, expanding our comprehensive OneWeb portfolio. This user terminal is a continuation of our continued mission to “strengthen connectivity”, enabling customers in remote and difficult environments to access a cost-effective and enhanced user experience that would otherwise be inaccessible to them. Intellian’s OW1, along with OneWeb’s LEO service, can enable business growth, strengthen education, and support the delivery of essential services in communities globally.

OW1 is Intellian’s first flat panel antenna. Intellian announced its partnership with OneWeb to build terminals for the fixed and maritime enterprise markets in 2019. The antennas were initially expected to be ready in 2020, but were pushed back due to delays associated with COVID and the restructuring of the bankruptcy of OneWeb.


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LG demonstrates 6G data transmission using terahertz spectrum

Korean technology company LG Electronics said it has successfully demonstrated “6G” wireless terahertz (THz) data transmission and reception over 100 meters in an outdoor setting.

6G systems don’t technically exist because they haven’t been standardized yet, but terahertz frequencies – beyond millimeter waves – are being explored to be part of future systems.

In a statement, LG said its work was carried out in collaboration with the German research laboratory Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft on August 13, with data traveling between the Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute (HHI) and the Berlin Institute of Technology. in Germany.

LG noted that since terahertz frequencies have a short range and experience power loss when transmitting and receiving between antennas, one of the biggest challenges for the future of 6G wireless is the need for power amplification to generate a stable signal at ultra wideband frequencies. The power amplifier developed by LG, Fraunhofer HHI and the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solids Physics (IAF) was crucial for the success of this latest test, the Korean company added.

The power amplifier is capable of generating a stable signal output up to 15 dBm in the frequency range of 155-175 GHz. LG noted that it had also successfully demonstrated adaptive beamforming technology, which changes the direction of the signal based on changes in channel and receiver position; as well as high gain antenna switching, which combines the output signals of several power amplifiers and transmits them to specific antennas.

“The success of this test demonstrates that we are getting closer and closer to the successful application of the terahertz radio communications spectrum into the next 6G era,” said Dr. IP Park, president and chief technical officer of LG Electronics. “Our successful partnerships with local and global research institutions and organizations to advance the development of 6G capabilities have been very rewarding. “

In 2019, LG established the LG-KAIST 6G Research Center in partnership with the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST).

Earlier this year, LG and KAIST partnered with US test and measurement company Keysight Technologies to research future 6G technologies.

Under the terms of the agreement, the three partners will cooperate in the development of technologies related to terahertz frequencies, widely regarded as a key frequency band for 6G communications, which have not yet been standardized. The partners aim to complete 6G research by 2024.

LG previously said 6G is expected to hit the market in 2029. LG also noted that future 6G technologies will offer faster data speed, lower latency, and higher reliability than 5G, and will be able to deliver the concept of the Ambient Internet of Everything (AIoE), which provides an enhanced connected experience for users.

Last year, the government of South Korea announced its intention to launch a pilot project for not yet standardized 6G mobile services in 2026. The Korean government expects 6G services to be commercially available in Korea between 2028 and 2030.

The Korean government’s 6G strategy consists of preventive development of next-generation technologies, securing standard and high-value-added patents, and laying the foundation for R&D and industry. The Korean government plans to invest a total of 200 billion KRW (currently $ 179.2 million) between 2021 and 2026 to secure core 6G technology.

The government has selected five major areas for the pilot: immersive digital healthcare content, self-driving cars, smart cities and smart factories.


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Mobile users harmed by poor network coverage and internet speed

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Customers of mobile operators on Sunday raised allegations against operators, including being billed for no reason and providing poor internet speed and poor network coverage.

Customers filed complaints during an online public hearing on the country’s telecommunications services conducted by the Bangladesh Telecommunications Regulatory Commission that day.

BTRC President Shyam Sunder Sikder, Vice President Subrata Roy Maitra, Commissioners Md Mohiuddin Ahmed, Abu Syed Diljar Hussain and AKM Shahiduzzaman, among others, attended the hearing.

BTRC Director General Brigadier General Nasim Parvez, in his presentation on the complaints and customer observations that were placed during the previous public hearing and how it was conducted, said the commission received 25,095 complaints about the quality of service from customers between July 2019 and June 2021.

He also mentioned that telecom operators, on the commission’s instructions, had reduced the number of packages they offered to 235 in 2020 from 359.

During the public hearing, Banglalink subscriber Abdul Kayum said the telecom operator billed him Tk 55 in 2019 in three phases for subscribing to a service called Idea under the short code 9494.

“But, I had never subscribed to such a Banglalink service,” he said.

When he contacted customer service by phone and physically, and asked them to provide him with billing details, his efforts were in vain.

Later, Kayum served legal advice on the Banglalink general manager and the BTRC chairman, and then the operator returned the Tk 45 to him on the accused Tk 55.

He said the operator had not yet returned the remaining Tk 10 they charged him for nothing.

While sharing his personal experience, Kayum said the operator stole money from many people like him.

He asked, “Does the telecommunications regulator have any conclusions as to how much money Banglalink has stolen from customers in this way?” “

In response, Shyam Sunder Sikder said he would take this as a special case and look into the matter properly.

Sheikh Mohammad Niyamul Islam, a Grameenphone customer in Chandpur, said the telecom operator’s subscribers did not have a connection to the mobile network at home and had no recourse even after complaining to the competent authority.

“We only get the network connection on the road”,

he said.

He also mentioned that the ISPs in Chandpur were working as a union and this acted as a barrier to getting broadband internet service at competitive prices.

In response, BTRC director general Brigadier General Md Ehsanul Kabir said they would look into the issues, adding that regulatory action will be taken against those responsible if the allegations are proven.

Teletalk customer Shoriful Alam said public telecom operator Teletalk has provided poor service and even its third generation telecom service or 3G service has yet to reach many marginalized areas.

A second Teletalk subscriber, Monirul Islam, said that Tetelalk’s voice and data services were very poor in their community of Cumilla.

He asked why the telecom operator provided poor service when it was a state-owned company.

Shyam Sunder Sikder, in response to the question, said that the capital base of other private telecom operators is better than that of Teletalk and that this is a major difference between the operators.

He did however mention that the government had taken initiatives to strengthen its network and that Teletalk would implement a plan to launch 5G service by the end of this year.

Describing his suffering after using the mobile number portability service, Sayed Nazrul Islam, a Chattogram telecommunications subscriber, said that the technical difficulty in receiving his banking-related text messages after using the MNP service forced him to return to his former operator.

Responding to customer complaints about voice and internet services, BTRC director general Brigadier General Md Shahidul Alam said the commission had made efforts to allocate more spectrum to telecom operators as part of the process. of the BTRC’s decision to improve the quality of service.

He also informed that telecom operators have so far used 157 MHz spectrum to provide services to customers and that the commission has planned to increase spectrum allocation between telecom operators to 450 MHz so that they can provide satisfactory service to customers.


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Euroconsult’s In-Flight Entertainment & Connectivity (IFEC) report is now available

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After an unprecedented year for the aviation industry, given the global impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, international leader in consulting and market intelligence Euroconsult published the ninth edition of their report which analyzes in-flight connectivity in commercial and business aviation.

The report, entitled Outlook for In-Flight Entertainment and Connectivity (IFEC) 2021 provides a comprehensive analysis of global market trends and forecasts for the next decade, in terms of connectivity provided to passengers on board. The report also presents an analysis of the impact on the market over the past year of factors related to the pandemic, such as blockages nationwide, ground flights and the inaccessibility of new facilities due border closures, estimating that revenues from in-flight connectivity services have fallen by nearly a third, to a total of $ 970 million.

Euroconsult predicts that the recovery of the IFEC market will depend on the recovery of the aviation industry and the long-term impacts of the COVID-19 crisis. Based on two scenarios, high case and low case, the analysis predicts that the total number of connected aircraft will reach between 16,000 and 20,000 by the end of this decade. This number is lower than previous forecasts, due to the pandemic.

The IFEC report assesses several other effects that the pandemic has introduced to the market, such as Chapter 11 procedures that led to a reorganization of the landscape. “The COVID-19 pandemic acted as a catalyst», Declared Euroconsult Vishal Patil, who contributed to the report. “It triggered consolidations, mergers and acquisitions. “

Examples of such activity specific to this market include Gogo Commercial Aviationacquisition by Intelsat and broadband and entertainment provider Anuvu, previously Global eagle, which, after filing for Chapter 11 in July 2020, has since been released with private funding. Broadband satellite operator OneWeb was also the subject of a similar financing procedure.

The 2021 edition shows that around 9,000 planes from 115 airlines are currently equipped with in-flight connectivity terminals (IFCs), a reduction of 2.5% from the previous year. Over 80% of these planes were connected via satellite connectivity, the rest being connected via Air-To-Sol. The rate of new installations has been much lower this year due to regional blockages, leading to difficulties in accessing aircraft.

Unlike previous reports, this new edition takes regional aircraft and turboprop engines into account in the connectivity analysis, as well as mobile satellite service (MSS) solutions. An update on the introduction of Satellite in non-geostationary orbit (NGOs) systems is also provided, covering the tastes of the EspaceX exploited Star link constellation, as well as Telesat and OneWeb, as well as the availability of capacity for aviation first in Ku-band and then in Ka-band.

The 9th edition of Euroconsult In-flight entertainment and connectivity prospects is available for purchase now on their online Digital platform and includes, but is not limited to, satellite operators and service providers, as well as system integrators, equipment manufacturers and airlines.

Premium Edition subscribers will have full access to an extensive database providing connectivity status by aircraft, service provider, frequency and solution. This comprehensive database is updated quarterly rather than annually.


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County invests $ 1 million in broadband expansion

Aug 22 – CUMBERLAND – The Allegany County Council of Commissioners has invested $ 1 million to bring wireless internet service to several areas with little to no connectivity.

The investment includes the installation of equipment at six sites in addition to four new towers across the county. Additional coverage has been added to Cash Valley, Ellerslie, Flintstone, the Warrior Mountain area and Oldtown.

The need to improve high-speed internet access has been a priority for several years and has become more prevalent during the COVID-19 pandemic, as working from home, virtual education, and telemedicine have become a challenge in these. regions and in others of the county.

“As last year demonstrated, broadband is more important than ever. Allegany County is committed to making these continued investments for the long-term benefit of our community,” said Jake Shade, President of the commission.

Funding for the expansion came from the federal coronavirus relief program and state grants.

The expansion builds on the existing Allconet wireless network, which was first installed in the county in 1996. Allconet has partnered with Conxx NE, which provides data transfer and networking service. , to implement upgrades. Over the past few months, the Allconet network has been tested and optimized to fine-tune extended Internet service for residents and businesses in the region. The extension can provide speeds of up to 100mbps upload and 10mbps upload.

“Allconet core network speeds have increased tenfold in some areas,” Shade said.

“While this does not completely eliminate the service gaps, the new service offers a significant increase in broadband availability for residents and businesses,” said Beth Thomas, director of information technology for the county. from Allegany. “We now have this carrier-class service operational to enable local residents, institutions and businesses to be more efficient and competitive.”

The Allconet wireless system was established in 1996 when the state offered financial incentives to help wire public school buildings for fast Internet access. But connecting public schools with fiber optic cable would have been prohibitively expensive. As an alternative, officials at Allegany County public schools suggested a wireless network in which signals would be transmitted via microwave relays, traveling from one high point to another.

The first antenna was mounted on top of the Allegany County Courthouse.

A decision was made in the early 2000s to extend the wireless network to residents. The network now covers more than 90% of the county, including Frostburg State University and more than 40 government entities and nonprofits. Two retail providers, SkyPacket and TWR, serve approximately 75,000 residents.

In addition to the expanded service areas, Allegany County Commissioners are helping to make the connection affordable for households. To reduce the cost of the connection, customer equipment was purchased for the Allconet deployment to allow participating ISPs to waive their equipment costs. CPEs are available on a first come, first served basis.

Residents and businesses can inquire about the service from Internet service providers affiliated with Allconet, SkyPacket Networks, Fibercreek and TWR Communications.

Greg Larry is a reporter for the Cumberland Times-News. To reach him, call 304-639-4951, email glarry@times-news.com, and follow him on Twitter.


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County invests $ 1 million in broadband expansion | Local News

CUMBERLAND – The Allegany County Council of Commissioners has invested $ 1 million to bring wireless internet service to multiple areas with little to no connectivity.

The investment includes the installation of equipment at six sites in addition to four new towers across the county. Additional coverage has been added to Cash Valley, Ellerslie, Flintstone, the Warrior Mountain area and Oldtown.

The need to improve high-speed internet access has been a priority for several years and has become more prevalent during the COVID-19 pandemic, as working from home, virtual education, and telemedicine have become a challenge in these. regions and in others of the county.

“As last year showed, broadband is more important than ever. Allegany County is committed to making these ongoing investments for the long-term benefit of our community, ”said Jake Shade, chair of the commission.

Funding for the expansion came from the federal coronavirus relief program and state grants.

The expansion builds on the existing Allconet wireless network, which was first installed in the county in 1996. Allconet has partnered with Conxx NE, which provides data transfer and networking service. , to implement upgrades. Over the past few months, the Allconet network has been tested and optimized to fine-tune extended Internet service for residents and businesses in the region. The extension can provide speeds of up to 100mbps upload and 10mbps upload.

“Allconet core network speeds have increased tenfold in some areas,” Shade said.

“While this does not completely eliminate the service gaps, the new service offers a significant increase in broadband availability for residents and businesses,” said Beth Thomas, director of information technology for the county. from Allegany. “We now have this carrier-class service operational to enable local residents, institutions and businesses to be more efficient and competitive. “

The Allconet wireless system was established in 1996 when the state offered financial incentives to help wire public school buildings for fast Internet access. But connecting public schools with fiber optic cable would have been prohibitively expensive. As an alternative, officials at Allegany County public schools suggested a wireless network in which signals would be transmitted via microwave relays, traveling from one high point to another.

The first antenna was mounted on top of the Allegany County Courthouse.

A decision was made in the early 2000s to extend the wireless network to residents. The network now covers more than 90% of the county, including Frostburg State University and more than 40 government entities and nonprofits. Two retail providers, SkyPacket and TWR, serve approximately 75,000 residents.

In addition to the expanded service areas, Allegany County Commissioners are helping to make the connection affordable for households. To reduce the cost of the connection, customer equipment was purchased for the Allconet deployment to allow participating ISPs to waive their equipment costs. CPEs are available on a first come, first served basis.

Residents and businesses can inquire about the service from Internet service providers affiliated with Allconet, SkyPacket Networks, Fibercreek and TWR Communications.


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UTEP hosts Operation Connectivity to bring more e-learning devices and Internet access to students

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EL PASO, Texas (August 20, 2021) – The University of Texas at El Paso hosted Operation Connectivity for an update on the group’s progress to provide 5.5 million Texas public school students with a device online learning supported by a reliable Internet connection.

Operation Connectivity, a joint effort between Texas Governor Greg Abbott, the Texas Legislature, the Dallas Independent School District and the Texas Education Agency, took stock Friday at the El Paso Natural Gas Conference Center in UTEP.

Gaby Rowe, Head of Operational Connectivity and Lead Partner of Grow Associates, stressed to the audience that it would take a team effort to advance progress in connectivity to ensure communities like El Paso are competitive. in the future.

“The University has played an incredible role in bringing together all those who matter around this issue,” Rowe said. “A huge thank you to Dr Wilson and the staff for bringing the right people into the room; the people who care and the people who can make a difference.

During the update, the group discussed the progress of Phase 2, mapping and adopting existing infrastructure for economically disadvantaged students. The organizers said they were ready to enter phase 3, “the development and adoption of new infrastructure”, and the El Paso region will be one of the participants.

“We are thrilled with the opportunity before us, as we continue to make El Paso the world’s largest binational connected community and a visionary region leading efforts to bridge the digital divide,” said Ivette. Savina, Assistant Vice-President. for the awareness and access of students to UTEP.

Operation leaders chose El Paso in part because of the strong partnerships established by Digital El Paso, a public / private partnership led by El Paso County. According to its website, Digital El Paso wants to develop and adopt a clear regional plan for broadband, and expand the regional definition of infrastructure to include broadband as the fourth public service. Its members include UTEP, El Paso Collaborative for Academic Excellence, Borderplex Alliance, El Paso County, and the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.

The event included welcoming remarks from UTEP President Heather Wilson and presentations on Digital El Paso and Operation Connectivity efforts, launched in May 2020. Operation Connectivity worked to map broadband capabilities in economically disadvantaged areas based on the latest US census data in partnership. with Connected Nation, a national non-profit organization that helps agencies develop solutions to gaps in digital technology and high-speed internet.

Organizers hoped that the information shared at this meeting at UTEP would encourage stakeholders to move forward as a group to cultivate an inclusive broadband connectivity proposal. They plan to start phase 3 in September 2021.

For local and breaking news, sports, weather alerts, videos and more, download the FREE KTSM 9 News app from the Apple App Store or the Google Play Store.


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Digital connectivity and equity are increasingly seen as vital for health

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Stacy Porter, vice president of Consumer Centric Strategy for UH, said she sees digital equity as a social determinant of health.

“If you had asked the question five years ago, or maybe even two years ago, I think we all should have paused and thought about what that even means?” she said. “But today it seems so clear that absolutely it’s a point of risk; it’s a factor.”

Porter expects a formal move towards digital connectivity to be universally seen as a social determinant of health, just like smoking or physical activity. The problem will only become more intense and the gap more transparent in the future, she said.

Dr Akram Boutros, President and CEO of MetroHealth, was publicly discussing the importance of digital connectivity and the lack of internet availability in the neighborhoods surrounding the main campus of the system long before the pandemic. He called attention to the issue at MetroHealth’s 2019 annual meeting, where he pledged to connect neighbors within 3 miles of campus to affordable high-speed internet with the help of community partners.

The initial commitment of 100 households with a target of 1,000 also included the provision of free training (in English and Spanish) on the use of computers and a free laptop – although other initiatives who connected homes with devices during the pandemic allowed the system to change its focus a bit on the device part of the initiative, Santiago said. So far, they have connected more than 350 homes through this initiative.

MetroHealth began screening for the social determinants of patient health with the 2019 launch of its Institute for HOPE, which chose to add digital connectivity to the standard set of screening questions.

Dr Steven Shook, head of virtual health at the Cleveland Clinic, said the system routinely collects information on a number of social determinants of health, including tobacco and alcohol use, financial constraints, transportation needs, food insecurity, housing stability, intimate partner violence. , physical activity, stress, depression and social connections.

Information on digital literacy and broadband access is not being specifically collected currently, but Shook said the clinic sees an opportunity to do so, and it’s something executives are discussing.

“What we wanted to do first, I think, was really to get a feel for our improvement opportunities first, and that starts with just being able to measure what the digital divide is so that we can target our interventions. appropriately, “he said.

The UH and other providers are understandably excited about the doors opened by telehealth and the creative new ways they can deliver patient care, Porter said.

“But we can’t do that and lose sight of the patients who need and need more traditional types of care, or who need more help, more coaching, more access,” said Carry. “We are committed to leaving no patient behind, so that must be part of our goal.”

Until every individual in every neighborhood has the ability and knowledge to connect across the digital divide to telehealth and other resources, “we haven’t been successful,” said DigitalC’s Baunach.

“(It is) the responsibility of the education system, the health system and the system of economic development and opportunities to ensure that every person can thrive and have equal access to this fundamental infrastructure,” he said. she declared. “It’s like water or electricity in the 20th century. We have cut these neighborhoods off from their basic access to the things that determine the social determinants of health.”


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Quebec best performer in Internet speed tests | Replacement News

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An analysis of Internet speed tests in 53 locations across Canada identified Quebec City as having one of the best results.

A Local News Data Hub review of nearly 69,000 speed tests conducted in 2020 found that Quebec and Surrey, B.C. were the only two places where 50 percent or more of tests met basic service targets. for upload and download speeds set by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC).

The commission says Canadian households should have Internet connections with access to broadband speeds of at least 50 megabits per second (mbps) for downloads and 10 Mbps for downloads.

Half of the 855 tests performed in Quebec met or exceeded CRTC speed standards, while median speeds also exceeded board performance targets. The median download speed was 54.17 Mbps, while the median download speed was 11.36 Mbps. (The median is the median value between the top half and bottom half of a range of numbers.)

The only place with better results was Surrey, BC. Analysis of the data showed that internet testers in suburban Vancouver inhabit a whole different reality of connectivity compared to their counterparts in other cities and towns: 55% of Surrey’s 871 tests met or exceeded CRTC standards. The median download speed was 82.61 Mbps, while the median download speed was 20.09 Mbps.

In all of the other 51 locations, however, the majority of tests did not meet speed standards.

The CRTC says 87.4 percent of households in Canada can access speeds of at least 50/10 mbps, but that figure drops to 45.6 percent in rural areas. Higher download speeds allow users to retrieve online content such as web pages, videos, files, or music faster. Download speed determines the speed at which images, music, and documents can be downloaded and shared.

The Local News Data Hub, launched in January by the Local News Research Project at the Ryerson University School of Journalism, analyzed the results of 68,813 tests using a performance test managed by the Authority. Canada for Internet Registrations (CIRA). CIRA, a national nonprofit that promotes trust in the internet, launched the test in 2015, and since then people who want to determine their connection speed have taken nearly a million tests.

While CIRA’s test results are not necessarily representative of all Internet services in a community, they highlight the challenges that many people across the country have faced in a pandemic year where one service Fast and reliable internet was a lifeline.

Test results confirmed, for example, that although problems with high-speed internet access are most pronounced in small towns, rural dwellers were not alone in their digital misery. Of the 690 tests carried out in 2020 by internet users in Regina, Saskatchewan, for example, only 23% met both the CRTC’s minimum upload and download speed standards. The median download speed was only 23.555 Mbps and the median download speed was 6.685 Mbps. In Milton, Ont., A suburban community of over 110,000 people just west of Toronto, only 13% of CIRA’s tests met CRTC targets and median upload and download speeds were well below at the levels prescribed by the commission.

Data Hub analysis also showed that even though median speeds exceeded CRTC standards in some major cities, poor test results still indicated problems with access to good quality internet. In Toronto, for example, the median download speed was 55.46 Mbps and the median download speed was 12.74 Mbps. However, only 42 percent of speed tests met or exceeded the CRTC’s baseline standard.

In Gatineau, Quebec, the median download speed for the 820 tests in that community was 49.665 Mbps and the median upload speed was 17.84 Mbps, but only 43 percent of the tests met or exceeded 50 performance targets. / 10 of the CRTC.

Factors that can affect upload and download speeds include the make and model of the device being used, whether other apps are running in the background, and whether other devices are online at the same time. The type of service purchased from Internet service providers is also a factor. Details of service provider contracts submitted with 11,385 tests, however, showed these users were not getting what they paid for. A comparison of contract details with test results showed that contracted upload and download speeds were only delivered nine percent of the time.

A Burlington, Ont., Tester with about 183,000 people said he bought a download speed of 350 Mbps and a download speed of 30 Mbps. But in comments to CIRA, the tester said it was impossible “even to connect to a Zoom meeting due to poor internet speed despite purchasing the higher plans.” The test results for this user’s location documented a download speed of 27.42 Mbps and a download speed of 6.27 Mbps. Both are well below the CRTC’s 50/10 service targets.

Another customer in Huntsville, Ontario. reported paying $ 200 per month for 70/10 service. The client’s CIRA test, however, recorded a download speed of 5.52 Mbps and a disappointing download speed of 0.07 Mbps. “NO OTHER OPTION. Unable to work or study at home, ”the tester wrote in CIRA’s comments section.

Testing in communities of less than 50,000 people fell significantly below the CRTC’s 50/10 standard. The best results among these small places were in Bracebridge, Ontario. but they weren’t enough to brag about: only 23 percent of all tests met or exceeded both CRTC performance standards, the median download speed was 15.56 Mbps, and the median download speed was 1.53 Mbps.

“Internet performance in rural and remote areas has essentially stabilized during the pandemic …

In emailed statements, Bell Canada and Rogers Communications, two of Canada’s largest telecommunications companies, both pointed to a CRTC study released last September which concluded that the majority of Canadian Internet service providers are meeting or exceeding prices. maximum advertised download and upload speeds.

Nathan Gibson, a spokesperson for Bell, said in his email that it is “difficult for us to offer a specific comment on your datasets without seeing them.” (CIRA officials have said the detailed test results are proprietary, but they are ready to share them with the Local News Data Hub on the condition that only the scan results are released.)

Gibson added, however, that the CRTC expects 90 percent of Canadians to have access to 50/10 Mbps by the end of this year.

“Providing broadband to the remaining 10% in a country as large as Canada is a challenge,” he wrote, “but Bell is leading the way in accelerating the roll-out of our residential and rural fiber wireless Internet networks. . “

In its response, Rogers said the company “is committed to providing reliable Internet service to more than

rural, remote and indigenous communities. The advertised speeds, the release said, “reflect the total speed to the house to support multiple devices online at the same time.” The maximum speeds for each Internet tier that we offer are advertised as “up to” as many factors can affect a customer’s actual speeds.

The federal government has created a $ 2.75 billion Universal Broadband fund to extend 50/10 Mbps Internet service to rural and remote communities. The CRTC, meanwhile, is raising $ 750 million from major Canadian telecommunications service providers for a broadband fund to improve broadband Internet access in underserved areas.

The Data Hub analysis only included the 53 communities with at least 500 test results. In cases where less than 40 tests were performed from a single location during the year, the results of each test were included in the analysis. In some cases, however, dozens or even hundreds of tests have been performed from one location. To prevent these “super tester” locations from skewing the data, each is represented in the data as a single test result reflecting the median upload and download speeds for all tests from that location. Accordingly, the results of 68,813 tests performed from 26,677 test locations were used in the analysis.

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This story was produced by the Local News Data Hub, a project of the Local News Research Project at the School of Journalism at Ryerson University. The Canadian Press is an operational partner of the initiative. Detailed information on the data and methodology can be found here: https://localnewsdatahub.ca/2021/08/how-we-did-it-internet-speed-story-methodology/


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