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Test and measure: Anritsu and Qualcomm verify 5G SA dual connectivity

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Testing company Anritsu said this week that it has verified protocol compliance testing on its 5G NR ME7834NR mobile device test platform for dual connectivity in 5G New Radio Standalone mode, which it says , is an industry first. The system uses Qualcomm’s Snapdragon X65 5G RF modem system.

NR Dual Connectivity (NR DC) allows a device to connect to two 5G NR nodes at the same time, which Anritsu says provides higher throughput, better coverage, as well as improved latency and reliability. Specifically, the company said its test is the first where NR SA operates on both frequencies below 6 GHz and a millimeter wave spectrum at the same time, allowing devices to take advantage of both the increased coverage of frequencies below 6 and high data speeds which are supported by mmWave.

Anritsu said they have submitted the tests to 3GPP’s RAN 5 Working Group and submit them to the Global Certification Forum and the PTCRB at future meetings.

In other test news:

-The Platforms for advanced wireless research (PAWR) officially received the Federal Communications Commission designation of two additional “innovation zones” for wireless research test beds in Boston, Massachusetts and Raleigh, North Carolina. The Raleigh site in North Carolina’s Research Triangle has a PAWR test bed under construction that is expected to go live later this year. FCC action points to both this location and the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency’s new Coliseum headquarters – the massive software-defined radio test bed that served as a virtual battlefield for the DARPA Spectrum Collaboration Three-year challenge, which now resides physically at Northeastern University. – as FCC innovation zones, with the aim of reducing the red tape associated with the use of experimental FCC licenses in these locations. Innovation zone designations will expand the areas in which entities that already have experimental licenses can test – so if you have an experimental license with permission to operate elsewhere, you can also use an innovation zone, and you can conduct several unrelated experiments in the area.

-Manufacturer of mobile devices Vivo uses Keysight Technologies” PropSim 5G channel emulation for advanced over-the-air MIMO laboratory testing in real mobility scenarios in rural, urban and indoor settings.

Keysight also announced this week a new solution for testing Salesforce deployments that incorporates artificial intelligence. Its Eggplant Digital Automation Intelligence platform automates more than 70% of application testing, according to the company.

“This will accelerate the delivery of high quality business applications, which is essential in a digitally driven world,” said Gareth Smith, general manager of Eggplant for Keysight. “These enhancements demonstrate our ability to intelligently automate all aspects of the test lifecycle and deliver high quality software quickly. ”

– Analyst firm Global Industry Analysts (GIA) predicts the global general-purpose electronic T&M instrument market to reach $ 9 billion by 2024, reflecting a compound annual growth rate of 5.2%. In a recent report, the GIA said that the market growth is driven by the increasing complexity of testing, the adoption of modular test equipment, and the demand from the telecommunications industry due to the deployment and adoption of high more widespread throughput, the transition to 5G and the continued demand for LTE. test equipment.

GIA said the United States is the largest regional market, accounting for nearly 32% of the global total, but China is the fastest growing region for T&M equipment.

-ICYMI: by Starlink Low Earth Orbit (LEO) broadband satellite service may provide faster download speeds than average wired broadband in a number of countries, new numbers Ookla show – although its download speeds and latency still don’t perform as well as those available on wired networks. Full story here.

Rootmetrics also released its latest assessment of operators’ 5G networks, based on testing in the first half of this year. The first half of 2021 saw a growing number of Americans with access to and better performance on 5G mobile networks. In terms of specific carriers, the honors continue to be distributed among the three national carriers. AT&T took top honors in Rootmetrics’ “Best Daily 5G” category, T-Mobile US was ranked best in 5G availability and recognized as having “excellent” 5G availability and improving speeds, and Verizon took home the award for reliability and improved speeds and availability. Read more here.


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Vodafone UK Pro Broadband Gets Super WiFi With Built-In Alexa

The mobile operator and ISP Vodafone has now enriched its existing range of residential fixed lines “Professional broadband”(FTTC / FTTP) by integrating Amazon’s Alexa AI personal voice assistant in their pack“Super Wi-Fi Plus”(Mesh network), which has also been upgraded to support Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax).

Just to recap. “from Vodafone”Pro“, which come at an additional cost (from £ 38 per month for 35 Mbps), launched in March 2021 (here) and were seen as a response to BT’s similar Halo plans. 4G-based mobile broadband backup (automatically switches to 4G if your service is interrupted), Super Wi-Fi (a mesh system for guaranteed Wi-Fi in every room), 12 months of free Norton 360 Premium antivirus , Xperts Wi-Fi (enhanced technical support) and promise to upgrade customers once FTTP is available.

REMARK: Vodafone currently sells a range of fixed broadband packages based on fiber to the cabinet (FTTC / VDSL2) and fiber to the premises (FTTP) via the UK networks Openreach and CityFibre.

Finally, all Pro customers who also have a qualifying airtime plan with us can save up to £ 3 per month on their bill with a Vodafone Set reduction (i.e. bundling with a mobile plan). In addition to this, there is also an option to switch to “Pro Xtra”Plans for an additional £ 8 per month, which includes Apple TV 4K, unlimited landline and mobile calls, with no contractual price increase, as well as Apple TV + which is included free for 3 months for new Apple TV + subscribers.

The key change today is that they have integrated Alexa and Wi-Fi 6 into their “New”Super WiFi boosters, which among other things give households the ability to listen to music, check the news, set reminders and activate Internet downtime, etc. Pay monthly on mobile Plans can also use Vodafone’s OneNumber service to make and receive calls on their Super WiFi Plus booster with Alexa, using their existing mobile phone number and allowance.

Max Taylor, Director of Consumers at Vodafone UK, said:

“We launched Vodafone Pro Broadband earlier this year to provide our customers with unbreakable broadband at an unbeatable price. Now, we’re taking it a step further by adding this amazing, unique broadband service built into Alexa, bringing the latest technology into our customers’ homes, making family life even easier.

However, Vodafone’s announcement does not specify whether existing customers with their Super Wi-Fi mesh system will be able to benefit from the new Alexa functionality (i.e. via a firmware upgrade), or whether it will not. ‘is only available for new subscribers. We assume this is only for new customers, given the significant changes to the devices, but this is currently under review and we will let you know soon.

In addition, for each new and existing Vodafone Together customer, Vodafone will provide a person in need with a SIM card, loaded with 20 GB of data as well as free calls and SMS each month for one year. The ‘Buy One, Give One’ initiative aims to ensure connectivity reaches those who need it most, with SIM cards being distributed through Trussell Trust’s UK network of food bank centers.


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Starlink beats HughesNet and Viasat in satellite internet speed

from Ookla Speedtest Intelligence Report compared the internet speed offered by satellite providers such as HughesNet, Starlink and Viasat during the second quarter of 2021.

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Starlink was the only satellite internet provider in the United States with fixed broadband-like latency figures and median download speeds of 97.23 Mbps in the second quarter of 2021 compared to 65.72 Mbps in the first quarter 2021.

HughesNet was far second at 19.73 Mbps versus 15.07 Mbps in Q1 2021 and Viasat third at 18.13 Mbps versus 17.67 Mbps in Q1 2021.

HughesNet, Starlink, and Viasat do not offer 115.22 Mbps download speed provided by fixed broadband providers in the United States in Q2 2021.

Starlink’s download speed of 13.89 Mbps was closer to that of fixed broadband (17.18 Mbps in Q2 2021, 15.99 Mbps in Q1 2021). Viasat had the second fastest download speed among satellite providers at 3.38 Mbps (3.48 in Q1 2021). HughesNet was third (2.43 Mbps in Q1 and Q2 2021).

Brazil

Viasat’s download speed of 60.30 Mbps in the second quarter of 2021 in Brazil was very close to the national average for fixed broadband of 61.38 Mbps. Viasat’s median download speed (1.05 Mbps) was much slower than that of fixed broadband (28.75 Mbps), and Viasat’s latency was much higher (613ms vs. 7ms).

Canada

Starlink’s download speed exceeded that of fixed broadband in Canada (86.92 Mbps vs. 84.24 Mbps), making Starlink a reasonable alternative to fixed broadband in Canada. Starlink’s download speed was slower than fixed broadband (13.63 Mbps vs. 17.76 Mbps).

Chile

At 15.43 Mbps, HughesNet’s download speed in Chile in the second quarter of 2021 was not fast, especially compared to the country’s fixed broadband average of 111.94 Mbps. Download speeds also showed a large gap (3.23 Mbps for HughesNet to 39.48 Mbps on fixed broadband).

Colombia

Fixed broadband speeds in Colombia are slower than in the other countries studied. HughesNet posted a download speed of 9.28 Mbps, compared to 35.90 Mbps in Colombia for fixed broadband. The download speed was also slower with the satellite ISP (3.03 Mbps) than the fixed broadband (8.56 Mbps), and the latency was much higher on the satellite (799 ms versus 17 ms).

France

Satellite Internet users in France recorded Starlink’s fastest median download speeds of any surveyed country during the second quarter of 2021. At 139.39 Mbps, Starlink’s download speed exceeded the national average for fixed broadband of 70.81 Mbps. Starlink’s download speed at 29.35 Mbps was slower than the fixed broadband average.

Germany

Starlink’s upload and download speeds were much faster than national averages for fixed broadband in Q2 2021.

Mexico

Mexico has options when it comes to satellite internet, and the faster of the two options appears to be Viasat, for now. With a download speed of 13.95 Mbps in Mexico, Viasat was faster than HughesNet (11.92 Mbps) but slower than the country average for fixed broadband (29.99 Mbps).

Median download speed told a similar story, although HughesNet was slightly faster than Viasat (3.25 Mbps vs. 2.01 Mbps). While Viasat’s latency was high (672ms vs. 13ms for fixed broadband), it was lower than HughesNet’s (714ms).

New Zealand

Starlink’s download speed was much faster than New Zealand’s average fixed broadband download speed in Q2 2021 (127.02 Mbps vs. 78.85 Mbps), and download speeds were nearly identical (23.61 Mbps against 23.51 Mbps).

UK

Starlink showed a much faster median download speed in the UK in the second quarter of 2021 (108.30 Mbps) than the country average for fixed broadband (50.14 Mbps). Starlink’s download speed was also slightly faster (15.64 Mbps vs. 14.76 Mbps).


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Mombasa beats Nairobi in internet speed

Counties

Mombasa beats Nairobi in internet speed


Fiber optic cable

Summary

  • Mombasa is where you will experience the fastest internet on your smartphone in Kenya.
  • That’s what a survey conducted by global network testing and data analytics company Ookla revealed through its Speedtest tool.

Mombasa is where you will experience the fastest internet on your smartphone in Kenya. That’s what a survey conducted by global network testing and data analytics company Ookla revealed through its Speedtest tool.

The study, Kenya’s Mobile and Fixed Broadband Internet Speeds, was conducted in April, May, and June and indicates that residents of the coastal city enjoy an average mobile download internet speed of 32.12 megabits per second (Mbps). , followed by Nairobi at 21.79 Mbps.

Urban and peri-urban residents of Kisumu, Nakuru and Eldoret download content from the Internet at speeds of 21.02 Mbps, 19.41 Mbps and 13.72 Mbps respectively.

Mombasa also leads mobile download speeds at 17.13 Mbps, followed by Nairobi at 13.27 Mbps, Nakuru at 12.65 Mbps, Eldoret at 10.11 Mbps and Kisumu at 8.95 Mbps.

In terms of latency – the delay in data transfer – Mombasa peaks at 35 milliseconds while Nairobi and Nakuru are tied at 37 ms. Eldoret follows at 41ms while Kisumu has the highest lag among major cities at 49ms.

Nationwide, Speedtest ranks Safaricom as the fastest mobile internet provider at 27.54 Mbps, followed by Airtel at 17.48 Mbps, Faiba at 14.38 Mbps while Telkom, which owns mobile internet. the most affordable in Kenya, offers a speed of 8.17 Mbps.

“By measuring the consistency of performance of each operator, we found that Safaricom had the highest consistency score in Kenya during the second quarter of 2021, with 84% of the results showing at least a minimum download speed of 5 Mbps. and a minimum download speed of 1 Mbps. said the report.

However, after calculating the average latency of the country’s major mobile providers, Faiba reached 27ms, with Safaricom coming in third.

“Faiba is followed by Telkom at 33ms, Safaricom at 37ms and Airtel at 38ms.”

For mobile internet users, the study found that the average download speed in Kenya was 22.37 Mbps while the upload speed was 13.27 Mbps with a latency of 37 ms.

For home or fixed internet users, the average speed is 23.51 Mbps when downloading content, 20.16 Mbps when downloading, with a 33ms delay signaling a better internet experience than mobile users.

Faiba has the fastest fixed broadband provider among the major providers with a speed score of 23.19 Mbps, followed by Safaricom at 11.51 Mbps, Telkom at 9.03 Mbps, Unwired Communications Limited at 8.83 Mbps and Internet Solutions at 7.75 Mbps.

By measuring the consistency of performance of each fixed broadband provider, the survey found that Faiba had the highest consistency score with 43.9% of the results showing at least a minimum download speed of 25 Mbps and a minimum download speed of 25 Mbps. minimum download speed of 3 Mbps.

However, Unwired Communications had the lowest latency at 18ms, followed by Faiba at 25ms, Telkom at 34ms, Safaricom at 35ms, and Internet Solutions at 49ms.

“Eldoret has the fastest fixed broadband download speed in Kenya at 23.68 Mbps and an upload speed of 21.30 Mbps. Nairobi fell three places to the fastest city in average fixed broadband download speed during the first quarter, ”the study said.

Eldoret is followed by Mombasa at 23.27 Mbps download speed, Nairobi at 20.71 Mbps, Kisumu at 18.07 Mbps and Nakuru at 13.27 Mbps.

While these speeds are optimal for a third world country, Kenya is still well below Ookla’s global average download speed of 55.34 Mbps for mobile users and 106.61 Mbps for mobile consumers. Fixed Internet.


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Government’s £ 5 billion Project Gigabit fund to improve internet speed for 1.85 million locals | Scientific and technological news

The government has announced regions where up to 1.85 million locals in England will see their broadband speed increase through infrastructure upgrades by 2025.

The investment is part of a £ 5bn package for what the government has called Gigabit project “Upgrade digital infrastructure in hard-to-reach areas”.

It is also part of the focus by the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sports on starting “high growth sectors such as technology and creative industries” as well as “accelerating the recovery. of the country after COVID-19 ”.

The areas chosen by the government were chosen so as not to conflict with the investments already planned by the telecommunications companies.

Instead, the Gigabit Project Fund will be targeted at the “bottom 20%” of the country where state subsidies are needed for the upgrade to all-fiber broadband.

Details released Monday indicate that “up to 1,850,000 additional locals in 26 UK counties will have access to internet access at a gigabit speed of 1,000 megabits per second – enough to download an HD movie in under 30 seconds.”

While the government estimates this currently brings the total number of premises to 2.2 million, it also warns that the number of premises “could change significantly” before commercial work begins, with the majority starting in 2023.

The initial target of achieving 100% coverage for fiber optic broadband across the country by 2025 has been dropped to reach 85% by that date.

When the funds were announced, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said: “The Gigabit project is the boost we need to deliver super-fast broadband to all parts of the country.

“This broadband revolution will energize businesses and people’s homes, as well as the vital utilities we all rely on, so that we can continue to improve and rebuild better from this pandemic,” added Mr. Johnson.

Digital Secretary Oliver Dowden said: “The Gigabit project is our national mission to upgrade rural areas with the fastest internet speeds on the market.

“Millions of additional rural households and businesses will now be taken out of the slow digital lane thanks to our massive £ 5 billion investment and one of the fastest deployments in Europe.

“This broadband revolution will create jobs, energize businesses and allow everyone to access vital services at lightning speed, helping us to rebuild better after the pandemic.”


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researchers break long-distance broadband data transmission over 4-core optical fiber | Research & Technology | Jul 2021

TOKYO, July 22, 2021 – A research team led by Benjamin J. Puttnam at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) reported having transmitted data over a distance of over 3000 km (1860 miles). ) at a rate of 319 Tbit / s and a transmission bandwidth greater than 120 nm, on the S, C and L bands.

The team used a 4-core optical fiber with an outer diameter of 0.125mm to transmit the data, setting a record for transmitting data over an optical fiber with a standard cladding diameter. The long distance transmission signal bandwidth consisted of 552 wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) channels.

The system uses WDM and a combination of optical amplification technologies to enable long distance transmission of 552 WDM channels ranging from 1487.8 to 1608.33 nm. The team built a transmission loop combining erbium and thulium doped fiber amplifiers with distributed Raman amplification along the fiber itself to allow wideband signal recirculation.

By combining various amplification technologies, the researchers built a transmission system that capitalized on the strengths of WDM technology.


The Raman amplification part of the transmission system. Courtesy of the National Institute of Information and Communication Technologies.


The system measured the achievable transmission rate with each channel with PDM-16QAM modulation at distances up to 3001 km, where the data rate of 319 Tbit / s was achieved.

In addition to the C and L bands typically used for high speed long distance transmission, researchers have included S band in their transmission. Until now, ICTs have only built transmission systems using WDM on C and L bands, along with advanced modulation technology, to explore high-speed transmission in optical fibers.

Although S-band transmission has led to several new records for transmission capacity in optical fibers, the transmission distance in S-band has so far been limited to a few tens of kilometers.

The NTIC team hopes that its completion will pave the way for systems capable of supporting optical communications at the speeds necessary for 5G and beyond. The reported transmission demonstrates the potential of spatial multiplexing (SDM) fibers to support short-term high-speed SDM fiber systems, provided they are compatible with existing cabling technologies. The standard 4-core cladding diameter fiber used for the demonstration is compatible with conventional cable infrastructure, and researchers believe its mechanical reliability is comparable to that of single-mode fibers.

Graphic illustrating transmission demonstrations using fibers 125 µm in diameter.  Courtesy of the National Institute of Information and Communication Technologies.


A graphic illustrating transmission demonstrations using fibers 125 μm in diameter. Courtesy of the National Institute of Information and Communication Technologies.


NTIC said it plans to work to extend its transmission range to transoceanic distances, as well as continue to develop broadband and long distance data transmission systems to increase the transmission capacity of low-count multicore fibers. cores and other new SDM fibers.

The research was presented at International Conference on Fiber Optic Communications (OFC), which took place from June 6 to 11.


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JFC hopes on open access in data transmission bill – Manila bulletin

The Joint Foreign Chambers (JFC) expressed optimism that Congress will approve the open access in data transmission bill at its third ordinary session, stressing that the legislation will fill critical gaps in infrastructure. broadband by attracting more companies to invest in the data transmission and broadband sector.

The House of Representatives approved Bill 8910 at second reading and is expected to approve the measure at third reading when the session resumes. However, the Senate’s counterpart bill remains pending before the Science and Technology Committee.

“The JFC eagerly awaits any mention of the open access bill in SONA and recommends that the measure be certified as urgent by the President to underline its importance for economic recovery and more competition and investment in the broadband, especially in underserved areas of the Philippines. . The country’s digital infrastructure is not as good as the infrastructure of competing countries in the region, ”said the JFC.

Pushing for approval of the bill, foreign chambers noted that assessments by the World Economic Forum, where the Philippines is generally behind Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore and increasingly behind Vietnam, indicate that the Philippines has a less robust and competitive digital infrastructure.

“A major lesson from the ongoing pandemic is that developing a competitive digital infrastructure is essential for a better life for everyone in the Philippines and certainly essential for investment, especially foreign investment. Better education, jobs, finance, governance, health and a host of other activities essential to a strong economy, ”said JFC.

The seven members of the JFC and eight Filipino groups included Open Access in a list of seventeen bills in the letters sent

recently to President Duterte, President of the Senate Sotto and President Velasco, encouraging passage at the 18th Congress. The bill also gained support from the Department of Information and Communications Technology, the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas and its Steering Committee for Financial Inclusion, and the National Economic Development Authority.

Once passed, the Open Access Bill will provide a competitive policy and regulatory framework that will lower barriers and costs to enter the data transmission market. This will significantly improve data transmission services (faster internet speed and lower internet costs) across the country. Without substantial new investment and competition in each of the four “miles” of the broadband industry, recovery from the pandemic will be slower and Filipinos will be less well served than their ASEAN counterparts.

As experts pointed out during a recent Senate webinar, the country has a broadband infrastructure deficit and obstacles in outdated laws are preventing the growth of the Philippine Internet. The “Open Access in Data Transmission Act” is curative law designed to overcome specific legal obstacles and fill this infrastructure gap.

The Open Data Access Bill is introduced in the Senate under Senate Bill 45 (SBN) 45 drafted by Senate Speaker Pro Tempore Ralph Recto and Senator Grace Poe, and SBN 911, authored by Senator Ramon “Bong” Revilla Jr..

The seven members of the JFC include the American Chamber of Commerce in the Philippines, the Australian New Zealand Chamber of Commerce in the Philippines, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce in the Philippines, the European Chamber of Commerce in the Philippines, the Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Japanese from the Philippines. , Inc., Korean Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines, Inc. and Regional Headquarters of the Philippine Association of Multinational Corporations, Inc.



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Free access in the data transmission bill rejected by JFC

Foreign business groups have reiterated their call on the government to approve a bill to improve broadband infrastructure in the country as part of the accelerated digital switchover in the event of a pandemic.

In a statement on Tuesday, the seven members of the Joint Foreign Chambers (JFC) said they were optimistic Congress would give the green light at its third regular session to the open access in data transmission bill. .

“The legislation aims to fill critical gaps in broadband infrastructure by attracting more companies to invest in the data and broadband sector,” JFC said.

Foreign Chambers noted that the House of Representatives approved House Bill 8910 on second reading. However, the Senate counterpart bill is still pending before the Science and Technology Committee, they added.

The JFC is also eagerly awaiting any mention of the bill during the president’s latest State of the Nation address on July 26. Private sector groups recommend certifying the measure as urgent to underscore its importance on economic recovery, competition and broadband investments.

“The country’s digital infrastructure is not as good as the infrastructure of competing countries in the region. Notes from the World Economic Forum, where the Philippines is generally behind Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore and increasingly behind Vietnam, indicate that the Philippines has a less robust and competitive digital infrastructure, ”noted the JFC.

The pandemic, which has caused widespread mobility restrictions, has proven the need to develop a robust digital infrastructure, the joint statement says.

Once enacted, the Open Access Bill will provide a competitive policy and regulatory framework that relaxes the conditions for entry into the data transmission market,
JFC said.

“Without substantial new investment and competition in each of the four ‘miles’ of the broadband industry, the recovery from the pandemic will be slower and Filipinos will be less well served than their ASEAN counterparts,” the groups warned. companies.

The signatories to the declaration are the American Chamber of Commerce in the Philippines, the Australian New Zealand Chamber of Commerce in the Philippines, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce in the Philippines, the European Chamber of Commerce in the Philippines, the Chamber of Commerce and Industry Japan of the Philippines, Korean Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines and Regional Headquarters of the Philippine Association of Multinational Enterprises Inc.


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Japan Breaks World Internet Speed ​​Record With Data Transmission Rate Of 319 Terabits Per Second

Japanese engineers broke the world record for the highest internet speed, achieving a data transfer speed of 319 Tb / s, almost twice as fast as the previous record of 178 Tb / s, set less ago one year.

A study presented at the International Fiber Optic Communication Conference in June found that Japanese engineers recently broke the world record for the highest internet speed, achieving a data transfer speed of 319 terabits per second ( Tb / s). The new record was set on a fiber cable that stretches over 3,000 kilometers, and it appears to be compatible with the current cable infrastructure.

The transmission speed is almost twice as fast as the previous record of 178 Tb / s, set less than a year ago and seven times faster than the previous record of 44.2 Tb / s set by a photonic chip experimental.

The US space agency NASA itself uses a fairly basic speed of 400 gigabits per second (Gb / s). However, the new record far exceeds the current speed available to customers: in regions of Japan, New Zealand and the United States, the fastest home internet connections reach 10 Gb / s.

This new achievement was made possible by combining the existing fiber optic infrastructure with more advanced technologies. Instead of the traditional standard core, the research team used four “cores,” which are glass tubes placed in the fibers that transmit data. Using a technique called wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), the signals are then split into many wavelengths and broadcast at the same time. To carry more data, a rarely used third “band” is added and the distance is increased using various optical amplification technologies.

The new system starts the transmission process with a 552-channel cam laser fired at different wavelengths. Double-polarized modulation is then applied to this light, delaying certain wavelengths to create distinct signal sequences, and after that, each of those signal sequences is fed into one of the four cores of the optical fiber. The data is transferred via 70 kilometers of optical fiber until it reaches optical amplifiers, which amplify the signal during its long journey. The signal passes through two new types of fiber amplifiers, one doped with thulium and the other with erbium, before continuing its way through the traditional Raman amplification process.

According to the Japanese National Institute of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), the signal patterns are then guided into a new piece of fiber optic, and the Japanese research team was able to send data over a distance of 3,001 kilometers by repeating this process.

Once the protective jacket is taken into account, the quad-core optical fiber has the same diameter as a typical single-core fiber. This means that the new method will be considerably easier to integrate into existing infrastructure than previous technical redesigns of social information systems.

However, not only did Japanese scientists explode the 2020 record, but they did so with a new technical solution that can be easily integrated into modern fiber optic infrastructure.

Japan’s leading national ICT research institute for information and communications said it “will continue to develop broadband and long distance transmission systems and explore how to further increase the transmission capacity of multicore fibers. low-core count and other new SDMs In addition, we will work to extend the transmission range to transoceanic distances ”.


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Data transmission speed records record clocks of 319 terabits per second

The world record for the fastest internet speed was completely shattered as Japanese engineers demonstrated a data transmission rate of 319 terabits per second (Tb / s) via optical fibers. The record was set for over 3,000 km (1,864 miles) of fiber and is apparently compatible with existing cable infrastructure.

It’s hard to overstate how incredibly fast this transmission speed is. This is almost double the previous record of 178 Tbps, set less than a year ago, and seven times faster than the previous record – 44.2 Tbps from a photonic chip experimental. NASA gets by with “only” 400 GB / s, and it absolutely abolishes the speeds currently available to consumers: the fastest home internet connections cap at 10 Gb / s in parts of Japan, New Zealand and the United States.

The breakthrough was achieved using the existing fiber optic infrastructure, with more advanced technologies added. For starters, they use four “cores” – the glass tubes inside the fibers that carry data – rather than the standard single core. The signals are split into multiple wavelengths transmitted simultaneously, using a technique called wavelength division multiplexing (WDM). A rarely used third “band” is added to carry more data, and the distance is extended using various optical amplification technologies.

A diagram of the new transmission system

ICT

The system begins with a comb laser, which generates 552 channels at different wavelengths. This light is then subjected to dual polarization modulation, delaying certain wavelengths to create different signal sequences. Each of these signal sequences is then fed into one of the four cores of the optical fiber.

The data travels about 70 km (43.5 miles) of optical fiber, before encountering optical amplifiers to keep the signal strong over long distances. Here it goes through two new types of fiber amplifiers, one doped with erbium and the other with thulium, before going through a common process called Raman amplification. The signal sequences are then routed to a new segment of fiber optic, and repeating this process allowed the team to transmit data over a distance of 3,001 km (1,864.7 miles).

It is important to note that the quad-core optical fiber has the exact same diameter as a standard single-core fiber, after taking into account the protective jacket. This means that this technology should be relatively easy to implement into the existing fiber optic infrastructure.

A document describing the achievement was presented to the International Conference on Fiber Optic Communications last month.

Source: National Institute of Information and Communication Technologies


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